Working out a Sustainable Agriculture in Africa

Perhaps, pictures like this may strike your heart, this is one of millions of children in Africa suffering from diseases related to malnutrition. Although it has abundant natural resources, Africa remains the world’s poorest and most underdeveloped continent, due largely to the effects of: tropical diseases, the slave trade, corrupt governments, failed central planning, the international trade regime and geopolitics; as well as widespread human rights violations, the negative effects of colonialism, despotism, illiteracy, superstition, tribal and military conflict (ranging from war and civil war to guerrilla warfare to genocide). According to the United Nations’ Human Development Report in 2003, the bottom 25 ranked nations (151st to 175th) were all African nations.

Agriculture takes more than 50% share of the job market in Africa, with more than 10 million farms but still ranked the most poorest continent on earth, and still rely heavily on food items imported from European and Asian countries, thereby increasing the level of spending and poverty.

So many efforts were being made by both governments and non-governmental organizations to bring a lasting solution to this problem, but still the African continent remains at the top of the list each time poverty, hunger, or illiteracy is mentioned.

AP2020 is an effort to eradicate Hunger in Africa by the year 2020, so come and join us, together we can save millions of people.

What is Sustainable Agriculture?

Sustainable agriculture integrates three main goals–environmental health, economic profitability, and social and economic equity. A variety of philosophies, policies and practices have contributed to these goals. People in many different capacities, from farmers to consumers, have shared this vision and contributed to it. Despite the diversity of people and perspectives, the following themes commonly weave through definitions of sustainable agriculture.

Sustainability rests on the principle that we must meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Therefore, stewardship of both natural and human resources is of prime importance. Stewardship of human resources includes consideration of social responsibilities such as working and living conditions of laborers, the needs of rural communities, and consumer health and safety both in the present and the future. Stewardship of land and natural resources involves maintaining or enhancing this vital resource base for the long term.

A systems perspective is essential to understanding sustainability. The system is envisioned in its broadest sense, from the individual farm, to the local ecosystem, and to communities affected by this farming system both locally and globally. An emphasis on the system allows a larger and more thorough view of the consequences of farming practices on both human communities and the environment. A systems approach gives us the tools to explore the interconnections between farming and other aspects of our environment.

A systems approach also implies interdisciplinary efforts in research and education. This requires not only the input of researchers from various disciplines, but also farmers, farmworkers, consumers, policymakers and others.

Making the transition to sustainable agriculture is a process. For farmers, the transition to sustainable agriculture normally requires a series of small, realistic steps. Family economics and personal goals influence how fast or how far participants can go in the transition. It is important to realize that each small decision can make a difference and contribute to advancing the entire system further on the “sustainable agriculture continuum.” The key to moving forward is the will to take the next step.

Finally, it is important to point out that reaching toward the goal of sustainable agriculture is the responsibility of all participants in the system, including farmers, laborers, policymakers, researchers, retailers, and consumers. Each group has its own part to play, its own unique contribution to make to strengthen the sustainable agriculture community.

University of California – Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program

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